Comment

bigger dot proudly presents

THEN TO THE ELEMENTS BE FREE

written by Jeff Gray | illustrated by Jeff Parker | published by bigger dot

TTTEBF-1

"Life is in the shapes you discover among what seem like scribbled lines."

- then to the elements be free

Then to the Elements Be Free explores habitats, wild environments, and animals through the thoughtful use of language, design, and the human imagination. Jeff Gray's playful poem and Jeff Parker's whimsical illustrations fuse in perfect harmony, creating a delightful reading experience for people of all ages. We're so excited to share it with you, and hope you enjoy it as much as we do!

AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE HERE

Comment

Comment

Artists We Love: Gemma O'Brien

Gemma O'Brien, courtesy of The Jacky Winter Group

Gemma O'Brien, courtesy of The Jacky Winter Group

Gemma O'Brien's lettering is truly inspirational. The 29 year old Australian artist quit law school after a year to pursue a creative career by developing "a practice that sits between art, illustration, design and typography." 

Want to see more? Check out Gemma's portfolio , and read PrintMag's awesome interview with her!

Comment

Comment

Portada: A Serif Font Designed for Digital Media

 

 

Name: Portada
Designers: Veronika Burian and José Scaglione
Foundry: Type-Together
Release Date: September 2016

Portada, the new title typeface for Clarínis a serif font designed for editorial design and digital media. While sans-serif fonts are the preferred typeface for web and digital media design, Portada designers Veronika Burian and José Scaglione created their serif typeface to be just as legible as sans-serif fonts in digital formats.

 

Originally posted on AIGA. Read more about Portada here

Comment

The Final Day of Hot Metal Typesetting at the NYT

Comment

The Final Day of Hot Metal Typesetting at the NYT

source: Christopher Jobson for Colossal, reddit 

In 1886, the Linotype machine revolutionized printing by allowing larger volumes of pages to be rapidly assembled for print. Less than 100 years after the Linotype's advent, digital printing technology rendered it obsolete. In 1978, typesetter Carl Schlesinger and filmmaker David Loeb Weiss captured the last day of linotype printing at the New York Times in their documentary film Farewell – ETAOIN SHRDLU. The film offers viewers a fascinating glimpse into the world of hot metal typesetting and the historical transition into the digital age. 

Comment

Comment

printing books on demand - revitalizing brick & mortar bookstores with new printing technology

Source: NY Times

Les puf bookstore doesn't have any books. Instead, the Parisian bookstore prints books on demand using the Espresso Book Machine. Customers use tablets to choose books they want to purchase, selecting from over 3 million titles.

Image source: Dmitry Kostyukov for the New York Times

Image source: Dmitry Kostyukov for the New York Times

It takes about five minutes for each book to print, about as long as it takes to have a quick espresso. Called the “Gutenberg press of the 21st century,”  the on-demand printing machine sits in the back of the shop, turning PDFs into paperbacks. 

Image source: Dmitry Kostyukov for the New York Times

Image source: Dmitry Kostyukov for the New York Times

Read the full story here

Comment

Comment

Dream the Impossible Dream: Craig Welsh Restores a Masterpiece

Source: Neenah Paper Blog

When Alvin Lustig died more then 60 years ago, he left an amazing legacy of design, so much so that his widow decided to carry on his legacy and has ensured his works would never be forgotten. Check out the video below and make sure you go to their Kickstarter page here

As we reviewed things, Elaine would then help to sketch her ideas of how she felt the letterforms would best be refined. There would often be a lot of discussion followed by more refinement at my studio after the visits.- Craig Welsh

Comment

Comment

When Designers Push Printing Presses: An Exhibition

"Graphic designers tend to be a tactile bunch. As we spend ever more of our workdays interfacing with plastic screens, the experience of caressing textured, letterpressed, and embossed papers becomes even more precious and valuable. Conversely, the thought of visiting a museum, with all of its glass-encased objects and hovering guards, loses a bit of its appeal. But in the A+D Architecture and Design Museum’s latest show in downtown Los Angeles, touching everything is not only permitted, it’s practically mandatory."

design: Lorraine Molina and Jennifer Rider. photos: Andy Reed.

design: Lorraine Molina and Jennifer Rider. photos: Andy Reed.

Design: Chase Design Group.

Design: Chase Design Group.

Read more here Photos: M. Dooley.

Comment

Comment

Printing with coffee

Thought you've seen it all when it comes to printing? Think again.  Ted Kinsman of College of Imaging Arts & Science created the Coffee Drip Printer.  

"This x-y axis printer creates images by spitting out tiny droplets of coffee. The droplets fall in different sizes, with larger drops leaving darker splotches on the canvas. The printer uses an Arduino microcontroller to manage movement as well as the size of the droplets. The droplet size, nozzle distance, and paper can all be changed to create different prints. While the machine normally works with coffee, it can employ any kind of colored liquid and print on any surface. Once the droplets dry, the image takes on an unusual, mosaic-like appearance." 

In action - the current speed of the printer is 4000 drips per hour - or about one drip a second.

 

Read more Here

 

 

Comment

Comment

Loving Vincent

In the world of art, Vincent Van Gogh is no stranger. We recently came across a trailer called "Loving Vincent" an animated film featuring 12 oil paintings per second by over 100 painters. Check out more here! While you're at it, check out Van Gogh's Untold Journey, we had the pleasure of producing this book!

Comment

Comment

The Fine Art and Craft of 1960s Wallpaper Manufacturing

Words by Kate Sierzputowski on via this is colossal

February 17, 2016

This short film from 1968 demonstrates the newest technologies in wallpaper manufacturing, the narrator exclaiming that some of the processes found in the footage are nearly science fiction! The almost 50-year-old video demonstrates factory workers etching designs into sycamore wood, hand mixing large batches of psychedelic colors, and observing machines as they automatically screen print complicated patterns onto long stretches of wallpaper.
The film was shot at a factory in Perivale, just ten miles west of London. All of the wallpaper designs found in the video are garish and bright, shot in a time when people were intent on matching their wallpaper to their curtains, couch coverings, and clothing. One particular shot shows a woman reading a magazine at home amongst her patterns, demonstrating how pervasive prints were in the home during the time period.
Continuing with a nearly poetic cadence the narrator ends the short video exclaiming, “Designs in profusion, kaleidoscopic colors—interior decorating has come a long way since father first papered the parlor!” British Pathé, a once leader in cinematic journalism, has uploaded several thousands films like this one to Youtube. Make sure to search their channel for other historic documentation of cultural events from curtains to political crises.


Comment

Comment

Street Photographer Zun Lee Captures Untold Stories of African-Americans


Seeking out these points of connection is a large part of Lee’s 2013 project, Father Figure, in which he photographs African-American families in attempts to dispel widely-held public opinion and popular media portrayal of black male stereotypes. Both this project and his ongoing project Fade Resistance have received attention and recognition from The New York Times, The New Yorker, and Magnum Foundation, among others.

While Zun Lee’s own story of identity and self-discovery is impossible to separate from Father Figure, this project is more so an exploration of the loving “fathers” he had in his life growing up, instead of the ones he did not. 

Zun Lee is a self-taught photographer and visual storyteller currently based out of Toronto, Canada, although he was born in Germany and has since lived in several parts of the USA. Because of his nomadic lifestyle and a strained household during his childhood, “home” has always been a fluid construct for Lee—not tied to a physical space nor biological family, but instead created from experience and emotional responses. Lee, who trained as a physician, initially picked up photography as a way to relieve stress from his job. However, he quickly realized his interest in photography was more rooted in storytelling than image-making.

We at bigger dot obviously love books, If you are interested into buying "Father Figure" you can get it here.


Photos and Words by Format

Comment

Comment

Tauba Auerbach’s RGB Colorspace Atlas Depicts Every Color Imaginable

The RGB Colorspace Atlas by New York-based artist Tauba Auerbach is a massive tome containing digital offset prints of every variation of RGB color possible. For you designers, think of it as a three-dimensional version of a Photoshop color picker. At 8in. x 8in x 8in. the perfectly cube book was co-designed by Daniel E. Kelm and bound with assistance from Leah Hughes. What a beautiful sculptural object.

Comment

Comment

The Lost Story of Soviet Germany’s Most Famous Graphic Designer

Wittkugel’s designs were far more playful than you might guess for Stalinist East Germany

words by Liz Stinson

 

It was 1951 and Klaus Wittkugel had just designed a poster that was going to get him into trouble. As head designer for the German Democratic Republic’s Office of Information, the graphic designer was tasked with creating a poster for an exhibition about the Five Year Plan, which highlighted the GDR’s Soviet-style economic goals. Wittkugel’s poster had an army green background with sans serif numbers “1951-1955” that appeared to be advancing like soldiers. It was simple: clean lines and heavy type. The poster was, by most objective standards, totally benign.


After the exhibition ended—and it was considered a wild success—the local newspaper of record ran a piece condemning Wittkugel’s work, writing: “An abstract, intellectual play with numbers and format takes precedence over depictions of people and clear symbols… This ever-dominant formalist approach to visual communication continues to find its expression in other experiments that show a hatred of mankind.”

A hatred for mankind. Despite his loyalty to the German Democratic Republic, Wittkugel was censured because of the design. “He was basically considered a bad Socialist,” says Prem Krishnamurthy, founder of Project Projects and P!. “He had to go to reform classes, read his Marx and Lenin. My suspicion is in that moment something started to change in his work as well.”

Krishnamurthy co-curated Ost Und oder West [East and West], a two-part exhibition that looks at the work of Wittkugel and his contemporary Anton Stankowski (through February 21, 2016). The two exhibitions run in tandem; Wittkugel’s work at P! and Stankowsi’s at Osmos Address, both in New York City. Viewed side by side, they highlight how two graphic designers—both of whom originate not just from the same country, but the same school and teacher—developed their craft as a result of the environments in which they ultimately existed.

Unlike Stankowski’s corporate work for Deutsche Bank, Wittkugel’s legacy has faded over time. “This history has never been told,” Krishnamurthy says. Both Wittkugel and Stankowski studied under the same teacher in Essen Germany, but after graduating their paths diverged. Wittkugel got a job working in Berlin, while Stankowski moved to Zurich and later to Stuttgart where he became one of Germany’s most well-known designers of corporate logos.

Wittkugel eventually became the head of the GDR’s graphic design program, a position Krishnamurthy says was arguably more valued at the time. “In the East, a graphic designer was the highest form of artist,” Krishnamurthy says. Unlike painters and sculptors, graphic designers worked for the people, at least in theory. Their work communicated a message (propaganda or otherwise). Quite simply, it served a purpose.

Poster, Ich bin Bergmann! Wer ist mehr? [I Am a Miner! Who’s Better?], 1952

Poster, Ich bin Bergmann! Wer ist mehr? [I Am a Miner! Who’s Better?], 1952

Over the years, Wittkugel designed some of the most recognizable identity work from the Soviet era. But after his censure, Krishnamurthy notes that Wittkugel’s work began to embrace the human form over his more typical Modernist use of typography. One famous poster shows a young coal miner emerging from the darkness, his face covered in soot, the words “Ich bin Bergmann! Wer ist mehr? (Translation: “I am a miner! Who is better?”) written below him as a call to action. “It was like the ‘We Want You, Uncle Sam poster,’” he says.

Still, Krishnamurthy describes Wittkugel as an aesthetic chameleon who made elegant transitions from style to style. Krishnamurthy explains Wittkugel was self-reflexive in his work, often cleverly nodding to the process through which it was made. In one example, a poster for an election depicts a man hanging a poster. Another features a magnifying glass being held to a logo that reads “Qualität” (“Quality”), essentially inviting viewers to judge his work.

On the whole, Wittkugel’s designs were far more playful than you might guess for someone who worked for Stalinist East Germany.

Ultimately, the story of German graphic design—all graphic design, really—is left to what we choose to remember. Krishnamurthy says much of the history of design that was ultimately written about Wittkugel’s time focuses on designers working with corporate partners—the Eames and IBM, Stankowski and Deutsche Bank. “I think we tend to take that as a neutral condition,” he says. Holding up a piece of Socialist propaganda as an example of canonical design is, understandably, a less comfortable position, and as a result Wittkugel’s work has disappeared along with the dissolution of the GDR.

“On the other hand,” says Krishnamurthy, “if we have a designer who works for a Socialist government or a designer who works for the Communist party, we ask these deep questions of them.” Questions like, why did you work for that client? Is it ethical? Does that impact the value of a piece of graphic design? To that, says Krishnamurthy, there might be a simpler explanation yet. “The actual answer,” he says, “might just be that the East German government was a really good client, and they paid on time.”

 

photos by AIGA words by Liz Stinson

Comment

Comment

Music and Sound Vibrations 3D Printed Into Ceramic Vessels

Bouncing rhythmically to a deep beat, Studio van Broekhoven’s 3D printer produces ceramic vessels scored by sound. The objects spins as clay is applied in response to the amplified noise, forging visual markings into the clay by way of audio wavelengths. The project, “Solid Vibration” was produced by spatial sound designer Ricky van Broekhoven and designer Olivier van Herpt, who have been co-producing the objects that appear almost like woven baskets.
The project developed out of the collaborators’ combined wish to host Broekhoven’s “noisescapes” as solidified objects that could physically represent his abstract tones. For each of the vessels, a specially constructed speaker rig is mounted below the printing platform to emit a low sound that will influence the printing. “A moment in time, a song, a sound, they can now become objects that encapsulate the moment forever,” explains van Herpt’s website.
You can hear more of van Broekhoven’s work here, while taking a glance at more of van Herpt’s ceramics here. (via The Creator’s Project)

Comment

Comment

Richard Chavez 10X10 Project

We recently came across a personal project by Richard Chavez, we personally love Passion Projects and this one is no different. Richard took some of his favorite bands and albums and created new album covers, which we think they should be the actual covers haha. Make sure and take a look at all of them they're great!

Comment

Comment

Geometric Optical Illusions by Fanette Guilloud

23 Year old Fanette Guilloud, based out of the UK is a visual designer that specializes in geometric illusions that are hand painted. Inspired by the city of Berlin, Guilloud created a minimalist series of anamorphoses which were installed in the Generator Hostel in Berlin. The anamorphic geometric shapes adorn the halls and spaces almost transforming it into an art gallery. 
 

My GIF


My GIF
GDI_fanetteg_4_web.jpg

Comment

Comment

New-Generation Animators: Go Behind-The-Scenes With Three Animators Working by Hand

"For Colossal readers it shouldn’t be a surprise that we delight in seeing what artists and designers make with their bare hands, especially when it comes to animation. Monocle recently sat down with three top-notch animators who eschew digital animation in favor of stop-motion and other manual techniques. Go behind-the-scenes with Vera van Wolferen, Lucie Sunkova, and Daisy Jacobs (previously) as they talk about their process and animation techniques. For quick reference you can watch the films they’re working on in the interviews below."

Comment