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The Top 10 Best Books of 2015

As the year is winding down, we recently looked around to find the best books of 2015 and found a nice little review written by  The Washington Post  and we thought we'd share!   Between the World and Me   BY TA-NEHISI COATES  Between the World and Me” is a riveting meditation on the state of race in America that has arrived at a tumultuous moment in America’s history of racial strife. What it does better than any other recent book is relentlessly drive home the point that “racism is a visceral experience. . . . It dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscle, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth.” To be black in the ghetto of Coates’s youth “was to be naked before the elements of the world, before all the guns, fists, knives, crack, rape, and disease.” Throughout the book, Coates describes being in numb-inducing fear for the safety of his own body. This work, which won the National Book Award in nonfiction, is something to behold: a mature writer entirely consumed by a momentous subject and working at the extreme of his considerable powers when national events most conform to his vision.   Black Flags    The Rise of ISIS   BY JOBY WARRICK  The Islamic State, whose radical Islamic warriors have inflicted their brutality across the globe from the Middle East to Paris, was founded as al-Qaeda in Iraq in 2004 by a Jordanian thug known by his nom de guerre, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi. In “Black Flags,” Joby Warrick, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter at The Washington Post, explains the importance of this gangster and analyzes his continuing influence on the Islamic State long after his death in 2006. There have been a number of previous biographies of Zarqawi, but Warrick takes the story much deeper. Most important, he shows in painful but compulsively readable detail how a series of mishaps and mistakes by the U.S. and Jordanian governments gave this unschooled hoodlum his start as a terrorist superstar and set the Middle East on a path of sectarian violence that has proved hard to contain.   The Book of Aron   BY JIM SHEPARD  In the summer of 1942, German soldiers expelled almost 200 starving children from an orphanage in the Warsaw Ghetto and packed them into rail cars bound for Treblinka. Drawing on his imagination and dozens of historical sources, Shepard brings the Warsaw orphanage to life in this remarkable novel about a poor Polish boy and his friendship with the caretaker of the orphans, the pediatrician Janusz Korczak. The novel hangs on the delicate tension in the adolescent narrator’s deadpan voice — never cute, never cloying. Aron relays his world just as he experiences it: “The next morning my father told me to get up,” he says, “because it was war and the Germans had invaded.” And with that news, his town slides into hell. Although relentless in its portrayal of systematic evil, “The Book of Aron” is nonetheless a story of such candor about the complexity of heroism that it challenges us to greater courage.   Destiny and Power   The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush    BY JON MEACHAM  Jon Meacham’s new biography of George H.W. Bush accomplishes a neat trick. It completes the historical and popular rehabilitation of its subject, though it does by affirming, not upending, common perceptions of America’s 41st president. In Meacham’s telling, Bush indeed lacked an ideological vision, was as overmatched in domestic policy as he was masterful on the global stage, benefited from his family’s influence, and remains overshadowed “by the myth of his predecessor and the drama of his sons’ political lives.” What Meacham so skillfully adds to this understanding — through extraordinary detail, deft writing and, thanks to his access to Bush’s diaries, an inner monologue of key moments in Bush’s presidency — is the simple insight that none of these supposed flaws hindered the man from meeting the needs of the nation and that, if anything, they helped him. Bush sought power less to pursue a particular agenda, the author writes, than to fulfill “an ideal of service and an ambition — a consuming one — to win.” The story of how he did it is worth every page of this hefty volume.   Fates and Furies   BY LAUREN GROFF  Spanning decades, oceans and the whole economic scale from indigence to opulence, “Fates and Furies,” which was a finalist for the National Book Award in fiction, holds within its grasp the story of one extraordinary marriage. The book’s first half concocts the blessed life of Lancelot “Lotto” Satterwhite, the adored son of a wealthy Florida family who has great ambitions to be an actor. His wife, Mathilde, so long impoverished and alone, willingly takes on the chore of encouraging this self-absorbed, quick-to-despair young man. Groff’s flexible style can be impressionistic enough to convey the high points of passing years or lush enough to embody Lotto’s melodramatic sense of himself. And halfway through, Groff turns from “Fates” to “Furies,” and we see Mathilde’s life unmediated by Lotto’s idealized vision of her. Here’s a woman as determined as Antigone, as ferocious as Medea.   Future Crimes    Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable, and What We Can Do About It   BY MARC GOODMAN  Welcome to the brave new world of criminal technology, where robbers have been replaced by hackers and victims include all of us on the Web. Goodman, a former beat cop who founded the Future Crimes Institute, wrote his book to shed light on the latest in criminal and terrorist tradecraft and to kick off a discussion. He presents myriad cybercrime examples: There’s the Ukraine-incorporated start-up that sold what it called an “entirely new class” of antivirus software, which turned out to be crimeware — software that is written to commit crimes. Even the human body is hackable. Researchers successfully broke into a pacemaker and were able to read confidential patient information and could have delivered jolts of electricity to the patient’s heart. In the last two chapters, Goodman suggests how to limit the impact of this new brand of crime and calls for us to tackle cybersecurity in much the same way we treat epidemics and public health.   A Little Life   BY HANYA YANAGIHARA  Hanya Yanagihara’s novel, which was a finalist for the National Book Award in fiction, illuminates human suffering pushed to its limits, drawn in extraordinary, eloquent detail. At the opening, four young men move to New York City. They are devoted to one another, each with bright paths glimmering before them. Despite the brothers-in-arms setup, however, the narrative quickly concentrates on one of the men, Jude, an orphan with a mysterious past who becomes an assistant prosecutor in the U.S. attorney’s office. Jude’s desire to maintain a veneer of control, despite being haunted by sexual and psychological abuse, creates the book’s major drama. As “A Little Life” paints it, his friends’ love is the thing that could save Jude, if only he would let it. Through her decade-by-decade examination of these people’s lives, Yanagihara draws a deeply realized character study that inspires as much as devastates.   Purity   BY JONATHAN FRANZEN  As he did in “The Corrections” (2001) and “Freedom” (2010), Franzen once again begins with a family, and his ravenous intellect strides the globe, drawing us through a collection of cleverly connected plots infused with major issues of our era. That Dickensian ambition is cheekily explicit in “Purity,” which traces the unlikely rise of a poor, fatherless child named Pip. At least partially to escape her mother’s neediness, Pip accepts an internship with a rogue Web site in the jungles of Bolivia that exposes the nasty secrets of corporations and nations. Its leader is an Internet activist whose back story in East Germany reads like a cerebral thriller. Sustaining this for almost 600 pages requires an extraordinarily engaging style, and in “Purity,” Franzen writes with perfectly balanced fluency. From its tossed-off observations to its thoughtful reflections on nuclear weapons and the moral compromises of journalism, this novel offers a constantly provocative series of insights.   Welcome to Braggsville   BY T. GERONIMO JOHNSON  This shockingly funny story pricks every nerve of the American body politic. D’aron Little May Davenport, a polite white teen from Braggsville, Ga., arrives at the hypersensitive University of California at Berkeley as if he’s a Southern-fried Candide. The whole novel turns on a moment in one of his history classes when D’aron mentions that his home town stages a Civil War reenactment every year during its Pride Week Patriot Days Festival. A too clever, incredibly offensive, potentially disastrous plan is born: D’aron and three friends travel back to Braggsville and stage a mock lynching, “a performative intervention.” Johnson is a master at stripping away our persistent myths and exposing the subterfuge and displacement necessary to keep pretending that a culture built on kidnapping, rape and torture was the apotheosis of gentility and honor. But “Welcome to Braggsville” is not just a broadside against the South; it’s equally irritated with liberalism’s self-righteousness.   

As the year is winding down, we recently looked around to find the best books of 2015 and found a nice little review written by The Washington Post and we thought we'd share!

Between the World and Me

BY TA-NEHISI COATES

Between the World and Me” is a riveting meditation on the state of race in America that has arrived at a tumultuous moment in America’s history of racial strife. What it does better than any other recent book is relentlessly drive home the point that “racism is a visceral experience. . . . It dislodges brains, blocks airways, rips muscle, extracts organs, cracks bones, breaks teeth.” To be black in the ghetto of Coates’s youth “was to be naked before the elements of the world, before all the guns, fists, knives, crack, rape, and disease.” Throughout the book, Coates describes being in numb-inducing fear for the safety of his own body. This work, which won the National Book Award in nonfiction, is something to behold: a mature writer entirely consumed by a momentous subject and working at the extreme of his considerable powers when national events most conform to his vision.

Black Flags
The Rise of ISIS

BY JOBY WARRICK

The Islamic State, whose radical Islamic warriors have inflicted their brutality across the globe from the Middle East to Paris, was founded as al-Qaeda in Iraq in 2004 by a Jordanian thug known by his nom de guerre, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi. In “Black Flags,” Joby Warrick, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter at The Washington Post, explains the importance of this gangster and analyzes his continuing influence on the Islamic State long after his death in 2006. There have been a number of previous biographies of Zarqawi, but Warrick takes the story much deeper. Most important, he shows in painful but compulsively readable detail how a series of mishaps and mistakes by the U.S. and Jordanian governments gave this unschooled hoodlum his start as a terrorist superstar and set the Middle East on a path of sectarian violence that has proved hard to contain.

The Book of Aron

BY JIM SHEPARD

In the summer of 1942, German soldiers expelled almost 200 starving children from an orphanage in the Warsaw Ghetto and packed them into rail cars bound for Treblinka. Drawing on his imagination and dozens of historical sources, Shepard brings the Warsaw orphanage to life in this remarkable novel about a poor Polish boy and his friendship with the caretaker of the orphans, the pediatrician Janusz Korczak. The novel hangs on the delicate tension in the adolescent narrator’s deadpan voice — never cute, never cloying. Aron relays his world just as he experiences it: “The next morning my father told me to get up,” he says, “because it was war and the Germans had invaded.” And with that news, his town slides into hell. Although relentless in its portrayal of systematic evil, “The Book of Aron” is nonetheless a story of such candor about the complexity of heroism that it challenges us to greater courage.

Destiny and Power
The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush

BY JON MEACHAM

Jon Meacham’s new biography of George H.W. Bush accomplishes a neat trick. It completes the historical and popular rehabilitation of its subject, though it does by affirming, not upending, common perceptions of America’s 41st president. In Meacham’s telling, Bush indeed lacked an ideological vision, was as overmatched in domestic policy as he was masterful on the global stage, benefited from his family’s influence, and remains overshadowed “by the myth of his predecessor and the drama of his sons’ political lives.” What Meacham so skillfully adds to this understanding — through extraordinary detail, deft writing and, thanks to his access to Bush’s diaries, an inner monologue of key moments in Bush’s presidency — is the simple insight that none of these supposed flaws hindered the man from meeting the needs of the nation and that, if anything, they helped him. Bush sought power less to pursue a particular agenda, the author writes, than to fulfill “an ideal of service and an ambition — a consuming one — to win.” The story of how he did it is worth every page of this hefty volume.

Fates and Furies

BY LAUREN GROFF

Spanning decades, oceans and the whole economic scale from indigence to opulence, “Fates and Furies,” which was a finalist for the National Book Award in fiction, holds within its grasp the story of one extraordinary marriage. The book’s first half concocts the blessed life of Lancelot “Lotto” Satterwhite, the adored son of a wealthy Florida family who has great ambitions to be an actor. His wife, Mathilde, so long impoverished and alone, willingly takes on the chore of encouraging this self-absorbed, quick-to-despair young man. Groff’s flexible style can be impressionistic enough to convey the high points of passing years or lush enough to embody Lotto’s melodramatic sense of himself. And halfway through, Groff turns from “Fates” to “Furies,” and we see Mathilde’s life unmediated by Lotto’s idealized vision of her. Here’s a woman as determined as Antigone, as ferocious as Medea.

Future Crimes
Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable, and What We Can Do About It

BY MARC GOODMAN

Welcome to the brave new world of criminal technology, where robbers have been replaced by hackers and victims include all of us on the Web. Goodman, a former beat cop who founded the Future Crimes Institute, wrote his book to shed light on the latest in criminal and terrorist tradecraft and to kick off a discussion. He presents myriad cybercrime examples: There’s the Ukraine-incorporated start-up that sold what it called an “entirely new class” of antivirus software, which turned out to be crimeware — software that is written to commit crimes. Even the human body is hackable. Researchers successfully broke into a pacemaker and were able to read confidential patient information and could have delivered jolts of electricity to the patient’s heart. In the last two chapters, Goodman suggests how to limit the impact of this new brand of crime and calls for us to tackle cybersecurity in much the same way we treat epidemics and public health.

A Little Life

BY HANYA YANAGIHARA

Hanya Yanagihara’s novel, which was a finalist for the National Book Award in fiction, illuminates human suffering pushed to its limits, drawn in extraordinary, eloquent detail. At the opening, four young men move to New York City. They are devoted to one another, each with bright paths glimmering before them. Despite the brothers-in-arms setup, however, the narrative quickly concentrates on one of the men, Jude, an orphan with a mysterious past who becomes an assistant prosecutor in the U.S. attorney’s office. Jude’s desire to maintain a veneer of control, despite being haunted by sexual and psychological abuse, creates the book’s major drama. As “A Little Life” paints it, his friends’ love is the thing that could save Jude, if only he would let it. Through her decade-by-decade examination of these people’s lives, Yanagihara draws a deeply realized character study that inspires as much as devastates.

Purity

BY JONATHAN FRANZEN

As he did in “The Corrections” (2001) and “Freedom” (2010), Franzen once again begins with a family, and his ravenous intellect strides the globe, drawing us through a collection of cleverly connected plots infused with major issues of our era. That Dickensian ambition is cheekily explicit in “Purity,” which traces the unlikely rise of a poor, fatherless child named Pip. At least partially to escape her mother’s neediness, Pip accepts an internship with a rogue Web site in the jungles of Bolivia that exposes the nasty secrets of corporations and nations. Its leader is an Internet activist whose back story in East Germany reads like a cerebral thriller. Sustaining this for almost 600 pages requires an extraordinarily engaging style, and in “Purity,” Franzen writes with perfectly balanced fluency. From its tossed-off observations to its thoughtful reflections on nuclear weapons and the moral compromises of journalism, this novel offers a constantly provocative series of insights.

Welcome to Braggsville

BY T. GERONIMO JOHNSON

This shockingly funny story pricks every nerve of the American body politic. D’aron Little May Davenport, a polite white teen from Braggsville, Ga., arrives at the hypersensitive University of California at Berkeley as if he’s a Southern-fried Candide. The whole novel turns on a moment in one of his history classes when D’aron mentions that his home town stages a Civil War reenactment every year during its Pride Week Patriot Days Festival. A too clever, incredibly offensive, potentially disastrous plan is born: D’aron and three friends travel back to Braggsville and stage a mock lynching, “a performative intervention.” Johnson is a master at stripping away our persistent myths and exposing the subterfuge and displacement necessary to keep pretending that a culture built on kidnapping, rape and torture was the apotheosis of gentility and honor. But “Welcome to Braggsville” is not just a broadside against the South; it’s equally irritated with liberalism’s self-righteousness.

 

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The Bucket List Song Book!

Guess what guys?! We published our very first own book! And Nate Lindley did an awesome write up about it that you can read here. The Bucket List Song tells a story of a boy named Jesse in Mr. Kell's music class and his ideas of a bucket list describing things he wants to do before he grows up.

illustrations by Nate Lindley

illustrations by Nate Lindley

Thank you to Youn Nam who did layout and book design, Nate Lindley who did all illustrations and to Tom Kell who wrote the song. Click here if you'd like to order.

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Mama's Sauce - About letterpress Printing

A boutique printing and design shoppe dedicated to using only the finest water-based inks and soy cleaning products. From t-shirts to business cards or even your band’s next show poster, Mama’s Sauce can handle it. "We strive to increase the impact of your printed materials while always looking to reduce the impact of what goes into their creation. The secret is in the sauce." 

We love these behind the scene looks into their process and how letterpress works. These people are true artisans when it comes to mastering their craft. 

 

 


[video via Vimeo photos via Mama's Sauce]

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The Art of Making a Book

 

In an age where we are constantly looking for the fastest way to make things, The Art of Making a Book takes us back to the hard work and diligence that used to go into assembling a book. From arranging metal letters into words and lines, to inking the words onto pages, this video makes one appreciate everything that goes into making a book.

 

[Image credit: Screenshot via YouTube]
[Via: Tenth + Fourth]

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Bill Gates Favorite Books of 2015

Rounding up the year of lists, Bill Gates shortlists the favorite books that he has read throughout this year. Identifying how all the titles revolve around the theme of “how things work”, Gates reveals the wide range of topics he has explored the past year, which could offer you some reading inspiration. 

Illustrating the six selected books in the medium of a short, charming video, the eye-catching visuals and simple explanations make for an enticing insight into Gates’ interests, briefly demonstrating how and why these books had attracted his attention.

Read more here

[via Design Taxi and The Gates Notes]

 

 

 

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Books We Love: Bibliotheca - Bible Redesign For Easier Reading

We love this collection of books that contain a redesigned version of The Bible which allows for easier reading. The books are still available on Kickstarter.

"The Bible is sometimes called the greatest story ever told. Its typography, on the other hand, leaves much to be desired. Unlike the layout of novels, the layout of the Old and New Testament discourages reading the book from front to back. Normally printed as a single, 2,000-odd page volume with microscopic, two-columned text, the Bible's typography is designed with reference, not readability, in mind. No wonder that while 73% of Americans say they are Christian, only one in five Americans will cop to actually reading the Bible on a regular basis.

A new Kickstarter project by Santa Cruz typographer Adam Lewis Greene is hoping to improve Biblical literacy. Called the Bibliotheca, the project is a new printing of the Old and New Testaments that is designed to be read from cover to cover. Greene's goal is to put readability first.

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The idea behind Bibliotheca is simple: What if we printed the Bible as if it were just another long book? Instead of trying to cram the 726,000 words of the New International Version of the Bible into a single volume, Bibliotheca splits it up into four attractive hardcover volumes, two each for the Old and New Testament. This is designed to make the typographical layout roomier and more psychologically approachable. Couple that with the adoption of a larger, custom sans serif font, line lengths optimized for readability, and the abandoning of verse numbers, and you have a Bible that wants to be read like a short story collection-- even if its page-to-text proportions are based on the dimensions of the Ark of the Covenant (and they are!).

It might seem like a relatively strange way to present the Bible, but as Greene points out, the verse and chapter numbers we associate with the Bible as reference points are actually relatively recent additions, having first been introduced in the Medieval era. He also argues that the Bible was originally meant to be experienced, not as a spiritual encyclopedia, but as literature.

"Today, our contemporary bibles are ubiquitously dense, numerical, and encyclopedic in format; very different from how we experience other classic and foundational literature, and completely foreign to how the original authors conceived of their work," Greene writes."

Sources: Fast Co Design and Bibliotheca

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June 16th is Bloomsday!

June 16th is Bloomsday!

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"To James Joyce fans, June 16 is Bloomsday, the day that Leopold Bloom walks around Dublin for the 732 pages of "Ulysses." The modernist classic, though a difficult read, has generated a multinational public display of literary enthusiasm -- perhaps because it's concentrated in just one day.

Joyce couldn't have imagined when working on the book that thousands of people would flock to Sweny’s Pharmacy to buy lemon soap, as Bloom does in the novel. That's just one of the stops in Dublin that Joyce fans will be making on Monday, where people don period costume, do public readings, and fill the pubs in his honor.

In Los Angeles, Bloomsday celebrants can gather at the Hammer, which celebrates Bloomsday this year with actors reading some of the book's densest and dirtiest parts. The reading, which begins at 7:30 p.m., is  bracketed by live music, Guinness and Irish food in the courtyard. The event is free; parking is $3.

The profane parts of "Ulysses," of course, made it the subject of a landmark American obscenity case. That trial, and the publishing, creative and censoring actions that led up to it, are the focus of "The Most Dangerous Book: The Battle for James Joyce's 'Ulysses'" by Kevin Birmingham, being published by the Penguin Press on Bloomsday itself. Birmingham describes his lively literary history as a "biography of 'Ulysses'" that "revisits a time when novelists tested the limits of the law and when novels were dangerous enough to be burned."

Joyce has fans in many professions, including computer programming, who create new technological twists on his work. This year it's an app called He Liked Thick Word Soup. Sentences from "Ulysses" appear in a visual snarl that you must pull apart and reassemble with your fingers. "By the end of your odyssey, you will have read up to four pages and 100 sentences chosen from throughout the novel, the creators promise, adding, "Your fingers' dexterity will have increased by an exponential factor, and your point of view on Modernist literature and experimental apps will have changed forever."

Worldwide Bloomsday events include a literary pub crawl in Brooklyn; public readings in Brazil, Australia and Italy; an exhibition in the Netherlands; a daylong program in Shanghai that moves from location to location, as if Shanghai were Dublin; drinks at Madrid's James Joyce Irish Pub; and Lucy Lawless (a.k.a. Xena, the Warrior Princess) performing in a Bloomsday cabaret in Auckland, New Zealand."

Thanks to LA Times and @paperhaus for the article!

Turn Your iPhone Photo Into A Polaroid With The Impossible Project

Turn Your iPhone Photo Into A Polaroid With The Impossible Project

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Turn Any iPhone Photo into a Polaroid with the Impossible Instant Lab polaroid iPhone device cameras
Turn Any iPhone Photo into a Polaroid with the Impossible Instant Lab polaroid iPhone device cameras
Turn Any iPhone Photo into a Polaroid with the Impossible Instant Lab polaroid iPhone device cameras

"After a wildly successful Kickstarter last year, the Impossible Project have finally made their handy iPhone polaroid printer, The Impossible Instant Lab, available to the general public. The portable lab allows you to turn any photograph on your iPhone or iPod Touch into a bonafide polaroid print in just moments, harkening back to ye olden days when photos were regarded more as physical artifacts that could be shared in real life."

Source: This is Colossal

Books We Love: Gestalten - The Outsiders

Books We Love: Gestalten - The Outsiders

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"The book captures the refreshing and evolving ethos of today’s smartly successful outdoor and lifestyle entrepreneurs and features interviews with key players from across the outdoor sector. Catering to modern globetrotters, these innovators are rethinking the ways in which the fundamental challenges posed by the wilderness meet the aesthetic needs of design-literate adventurers. The results are often radical, but always likeable with the occasional romantic or ironic wink."

Source: Gestalten

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Paper Art: Cut Paper Correspondence by Annie Vought

Paper Art: Cut Paper Correspondence by Annie Vought

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New Cut Paper Correspondence by Annie Vought paper
New Cut Paper Correspondence by Annie Vought paper
New Cut Paper Correspondence by Annie Vought paper
New Cut Paper Correspondence by Annie Vought paper

Oakland-based artist Annie Vought has completed several new structural paper works created by carefully cutting handwritten text out of large sheets of paper. Of her work Vought says:

The handwriting and the lines support the structure of the cut paper, keeping it strong and sculptural, despite its apparent fragility. In these paper cutouts, I focus on the text, structure, and emotion of the letter in an elaborate investigation into the properties of writing and expression. Penmanship, word choice, and spelling all contribute to possible narratives about who that person is and what they are like. my recreating the letters is an extended concentration on peoples’ inner lives and the ways they express their thoughts through writing.

You can learn much more about these new works over on designboom and in her recent interview over on In the Make. Vought currently has work at a recently extended group show titled In Other Words at Intersection for the Arts in San Francisco.

Source: This is Colossal

The Paradigm-Shifting Topic of 3D Printing

The Paradigm-Shifting Topic of 3D Printing

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"Let's face it—the golden age of 3D printing has now begun. In all likelihood, this development represents the largest technical upheaval in manufacturing since the invention of the lathe. Sharing a love of technology and experimentation, young designers like Claire Warnier and Dries Verbruggen of Belgian design studio Unfold continue to expand the possibilities of 3D printing and digital production. Recently, the duo transferred their ideas into Printing Things, a new book by Gestalten that presents the newest technologies and outstanding projects, testifying the paradigm-shifting topic of 3D printing.

In this video, Gestalten.tv meet with Warnier and Verbruggen to catch a glimpse into the 3D printing world and its background of what some have hailed as the third industrial revolution."

Source: Gestalten

Books We Love: The Drinkable Book

Books We Love: The Drinkable Book

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"A team of scientists and engineers from Carnegie Mellon and the University of Virginia have developed ‘The Drinkable Book’, a life saving tool that filters water and teaches proper sanitation and hygiene to those in the developing world. Designed by New York-based typographer Brian Gartside for non-profit organization waterislife, each book is printed on technologically advanced filter paper capable of eliminating deadly waterborne diseases, as it is coated with silver nanoparticles, whose ions actively kill diseases like cholera, typhoid and E.coli.

Once liquid is passed through the filter, bacteria count is reduced by over 99.99%, cleaning the water to a quality comparable to standards in north america. the pages cost only pennies to produce; each sheet from ‘the drinkable book’ is capable of giving someone in need up to 30 days worth of clean water, and features a paper supply that filters up-to 5000 liters."

this drinkable book cleans and purifies water with advanced filtering paper
this drinkable book cleans and purifies water with advanced filtering paper

step 1: tear out one of the pre-perforated sheets. each one will filter 100 liters of water

this drinkable book cleans and purifies water with advanced filtering paper

step 2: place the page in the slot, located in the base of the custom filter-box

this drinkable book cleans and purifies water with advanced filtering paper

step 3: replace the pressure plate, and pour water through; what collects in the lower reservoir is safe to drink

this drinkable book cleans and purifies water with advanced filtering paper
this drinkable book cleans and purifies water with advanced filtering paper
this drinkable book cleans and purifies water with advanced filtering paper
this drinkable book cleans and purifies water with advanced filtering paper

The sheets cost only pennies to produce.

Source: Design Boom

Paper Art: Bovey Lee

Paper Art: Bovey Lee

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"Power, sacrifice, and survival are the underlying narratives in Bovey Lee´s cut paper works. Within the parameters of these three subjects, he creates layered and dramatic stories referencing his life experiences, response to headline news, and concerns for urban and environmental issues. He hand cuts each work on Chinese rice paper with silk backing. He defines what he does as drawing with a knife. His life long love affair with art begins with practicing Chinese calligraphy and pencil drawing since age ten. When he cuts paper, it is a visceral reaction and natural response to his affection for precision, detail, and subtlety."

Source: Ignant

Magical Clouds in Empty Rooms

Magical Clouds in Empty Rooms

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"Dutch artist Berndnaut Smilde is best known for his fantastical Nimbus series, in which individual clouds appear to magically float in empty rooms. The haunting images portray the airy nimbuses drifting through gorgeous Rococo rooms, Gothic cathedrals, and abandoned factories, evoking a sense of mysticism or supernatural presence.

Carefully controlling the temperature and humidity in a room, Smilde uses a fog machine to produce the ethereal clouds that remain suspended in the air for only a fleeting moment. Although the nimbuses are visible for just a few seconds, their ephemeral existences are made permanent through photography. These works center on an impermanent state of being between construction and deconstruction, as the dreamy clouds appear and vanish in the blink of an eye.

Smilde's latest exhibition Antipode will be on display at the Ronchini Gallery in London until June 14. The show will feature the artist's stunning multidisciplinary works that synthesize photography, installation, performance, and sculpture. The exhibition title Antipode is a geographical term that refers to parts of the earth diametrically opposite each other, echoing Smilde's focus on duality in his artwork."

Source: My Modern Met

Paper Art: The Hunter

Paper Art: The Hunter

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The Hunter (Theatrical Installation) from Davy and Kristin McGuire on Vimeo.

The Hunter is a paper diorama that comes to life through projected animations, music and sound effects. When the intricately cut paper model illuminates, tiny shadow figures seem to appear behind the diorama in order to depict a silent fable about the cruelty of human conduct and the ability to repent our actions. The Hunter is a gallery installation that tells a 15 min narrative on a loop for a maximum of 10 people at a time.